Tuesday, November 12, 2013

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Attorney General Abbott Applauds American Airlines Merger Settlement; Secures Amended Agreement for Texas

DALLAS – Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott issued the following statement on the settlement announced today regarding the American Airlines and US Airways merger:

“This is a great day for American Airlines, for jobs in Texas, and for the economic opportunities that will arise from having the world’s largest airlines headquartered in Texas. The Office of the Attorney General’s early involvement in this case provided Texas a critical seat at the table and resulted in a settlement agreement that preserved competition, ensured daily flight service to communities across the state and protected Texas jobs.

Since our agreement was announced, we have continued working with American Airlines – and other states that objected to the merger – to achieve the best possible results for Texans and keep the new American on the path to success. Because of our early and ongoing efforts, we’ve secured an agreement that will leave Texas in a much better position, ensuring that Texas jobs will stay in Texas.”

Today’s agreement – reached by the airlines, the remaining states that challenged the merger and the federal government – builds upon the initial agreement Texas reached with the airlines last month. The agreement secured today expands the requirement that American maintain daily flight service to Texas communities from three years to five years – and adds the Texarkana Airport to the daily service commitment list.

The Oct. 1 agreement that Attorney General Abbott negotiated with American Airlines ensured that 22 airports across Texas – including more than a dozen smaller airports in rural Texas – would continue to offer daily departures and arrivals. The initial agreement also guaranteed that Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport would remain a “hub” and the headquarters would be located in Texas, in the DFW metropolitan area. American’s agreement to maintain hubs and daily service only applies to those states – like Texas – that challenged the merger.